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  1. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms include difficulty staying focused and paying attention, difficulty controlling behavior, and hyperactivity (over-activity).
  2. 3 times more men than women have attention deficit disorder (ADD).
  3. In order to be diagnosed with ADD, a child must display very strong symptoms that take a negative effect on their life for at least 6 months.
  4. The main symptoms and indicators of ADD are inattention, distractibility, fear, anxiety, slow cognitive thinking, daydreaming, procrastination, and poor memory retrieval.
  5. There is no cure for ADD, but the symptoms can be managed through medications and counseling.

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  1. Although ADHD and ADD refer to the same condition, ADHD is the clinical diagnostic term.
  2. The frequency of diagnoses of ADD/ADHD has more than doubled for adolescents in the last 15 years.
  3. Women who smoke during pregnancy may be twice as likely to give birth to a child with ADD/ADHD.
  4. Research fails to support a connection between increased sugar intake and ADD/ADHD development.
  5. About 4 to 6% of the US population has ADD/ADHD.
  6. Many noted celebs live with ADD/ADHD, like Ryan Gosling, Solange Knowles and Adam Levine.

Sources

  • 1

    National Institute of Mental Health. “What is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD)?” http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml. Accessed Nov 7th, 2014.

  • 2

    St. Sauver, J. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, September 2004; vol 79: pp 1124-1131.

  • 3

    University of Maryland Medical Center. “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder”. http://umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder. September 18th, 2013 (Accessed Nov 7th 2014).

  • 4

    National Institute of Mental Health. “What is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD)?” http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml. Accessed Nov 7th, 2014.

  • 5

    National Health Service. “Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder treatment.”http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder/Pages/Treatment.aspx. Accessed Nov 7th, 2014.

  • 6

    Attention Deficit Disorder Association. “ADHD Fact Sheet”. http://www.add.org/?page=ADHD_Fact_Sheet. Accessed Nov 7th, 2014.

  • 7

    Cooper, James and Jensen, Peter. “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: State of the Science, Best Practices”. Kingston: Civic Research Institute, 2002.

  • 8

    Linnet, K. Pediatrics, August 2005; vol 116: pp 462-467.

  • 9

    University of Maryland Medical Center. “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder”. http://umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder. September 18th, 2013 (Accessed Nov 7th 2014).

  • 10

    Attention Deficit Disorder Association. “ADHD Fact Sheet”. http://www.add.org/?page=ADHD_Fact_Sheet. Accessed Nov 7th, 2014.

  • 11

    Adult Attention Deficit Disorder. “Famous People with ADHD.” http://www.addadult.com/add-education-center/famous-people-with-adhd/. Accessed Nov 7th, 2014.

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