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  1. Over 3.2 million students are victims of bullying each year.
  2. Approximately 160,000 teens skip school every day because of bullying.
  3. 17% of American students report being bullied 2 to 3 times a month or more within a school semester. Take a stand in your community by hosting a Bullying Policy Makeover event customizing your school’s anti-bullying policy.
  4. 1 in 4 teachers see nothing wrong with bullying and will only intervene 4% of the time.
  5. By age 14 less than 30% of boys and 40% of girls will talk to their peers about bullying.

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  1. Over 67% of students believe that schools respond poorly to bullying, with a high percentage of students believing that adult help is infrequent and ineffective.
  2. 71% of students report incidents of bullying as a problem at their school.
  3. 90% of 4th through 8th graders report being victims of bullying.
  4. 1 in 10 students drop out of school because of repeated bullying.
  5. As boys age they are less and less likely to feel sympathy for victims of bullying. In fact they are more likely to add to the problem than solve it.
  6. Physical bullying increases in elementary school, peaks in middle school and declines in high school. Verbal abuse, on the other hand, remains constant.

Sources

  • 1

    Cohn, Andrea, and Andrea Canter, Ph.D. "Bullying: Facts for Schools and Parents." NASP Fact Sheet. Accessed February 9, 2014 http://www.nasponline.org/resources/factsheets/bullying_fs.aspx

  • 2

    The National Education Association. "Nation's educators continue push for safe, bully-free environments." NEA. Accessed February 10, 2014, http://www.nea.org/home/53298.htm.

  • 3

    Valerie, Strauss. "New data on bullying: 17% report regular abuse." The Washington Post. Accessed February 10, 2014, http://voices.washingtonpost.com/answer-sheet/bullying/2010bullyvictimdata.html.

  • 4

    Cohn, Andrea, and Andrea Canter, Ph.D. "Bullying: Facts for Schools and Parents." NASP Fact Sheet. Accessed February 9, 2014, http://www.nasponline.org/resources/factsheets/bullying_fs.aspx.

  • 5

    Rigby, Ken. "Bullying in Schools and What to Do about It: Revised and Updated." Aust Council for Ed Research, 2007.

  • 6

    Cohn, Andrea, and Andrea Canter, Ph.D. "Bullying: Facts for Schools and Parents." NASP Fact Sheet. Accessed February 9, 2014, http://www.nasponline.org/resources/factsheets/bullying_fs.aspx.

  • 7

    Nolin, Mary Jo, Elizabeth Davis, and Kathryn Chandler. "Student Victimization at School." Journal of School Health 66, no. 6 (1996): 216-221.

  • 8

    Osanloo, Azadeh. "Implications From UCEA Addressing Bullying in School." UCEA.org. Accessed February 10, 2014, http://ucea.org/storage/implications/Bullying-Implications%20from%20UCEA%20July2012.pdf.

  • 9

    Osanloo, Azadeh. "Implications From UCEA Addressing Bullying in School." UCEA.org. Accessed February 10, 2014, http://ucea.org/storage/implications/Bullying-Implications%20from%20UCEA%20July2012.pdf.

  • 10

    Rigby, Ken. "Bullying in Schools and What to Do about It: Revised and Updated." Aust Council for Ed Research, 2007.

  • 11

    Cohn, Andrea, and Andrea Canter, Ph.D. "Bullying: Facts for Schools and Parents." NASP Fact Sheet. Accessed February 9, 2014, http://www.nasponline.org/resources/factsheets/bullying_fs.aspx.

Have 60 seconds? Do something about bullying.

DO IT