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  1. A concussion is a mild form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head. A concussion can also be caused by violent movement or jarring of the head or neck.
  2. People who suffer from concussions generally fully recover quickly. However, in some cases, symptoms can last for days or weeks.
  3. Those who have already had one concussion seem more susceptible to having another.
  4. The most common causes of concussions are sports injuries (football, hockey, rugby, basketball, etc.), bicycle accidents, car accidents, and falls.
  5. For about 9 in 10 people with concussions, symptoms disappear within 7 to 10 days.

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  1. At least 25% of concussion sufferers fail to get assessed by medical personnel.
  2. Most cases of traumatic brain injury are concussions.
  3. In the US, athletes suffer from roughly 300,000 concussions every year.
  4. Immediate consequences include headache, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, fatigue, or unconsciousness.
  5. In certain severe concussions, symptoms can linger for weeks or even months, due to a complication called post-concussion syndrome.
  6. Loss of consciousness is thought to occur in less than 10% of concussions.

Sources

  • 1

    Center for Disease Control. “Concussion and Mild TBI”. http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/. May 29th, 2014 (Accessed Nov 11th, 2014).

  • 2

    Center for Disease Control. “Concussion and Mild TBI”. http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/. May 29th, 2014 (Accessed Nov 11th, 2014).

  • 3

    Kenneth Maiese (January 2008). "Concussion". The Merck Manual Home Health Handbook.

  • 4

    Ropper AH, Gorson KC (2007). "Clinical practice. Concussion".New England Journal of Medicine 356 (2): 166–72. doi:10.1056/NEJMcp064645.PMID 17215534

  • 5

    News in Health. “A Bang to the Brain: What we know about Concussions.” http://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/May2013/Feature1. May 2013 (Accessed Nov 11th, 2014).

  • 6

    Iverson GL (2005). "Outcome from mild traumatic brain injury".Current Opinion in Psychiatry 18 (3): 301–17.doi:10.1097/01.yco.0000165601.29047.ae. PMID 16639155.

  • 7

    Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, Peloso PM, Borg J, von Holst H, Holm L, et al. (2004). "Incidence, risk factors and prevention of mild traumatic brain injury: Results of the WHO Collaborating Centre Task Force on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury". Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine 36 (Supplement 43): 28–60.doi:10.1080/16501960410023732. PMID 15083870.

  • 8

    University of Pittsburgh Neurosurgery. “Concussions”. http://www.neurosurgery.pitt.edu/centers-excellence/brain-and-spine-injury/concussions. Accessed Nov 11th, 2014.

  • 9

    McCrory, P; Meeuwisse, W; Johnston, K; Dvorak, J; Aubry, M; Molloy, M; Cantu, R (Jul–Aug 2009). "Consensus statement on concussion in sport: the 3rd International Conference on Concussion in Sport held in Zurich, November 2008.". Journal of athletic training 44 (4): 434–48. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-44.4.434. PMC 2707064. PMID 19593427.

  • 10

    Ryan LM, Warden DL (2003). "Post concussion syndrome". International Review of Psychiatry 15 (4): 310–316. doi:10.1080/09540260310001606692.PMID 15276952.

  • 11

    Cantu RC (1998). "Second-impact syndrome". Clinics in Sports Medicine 17 (1): 37–44. doi:10.1016/S0278-5919(05)70059-4. PMID 9475969.

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