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  1. More than 1.3 million students drop out of high school every year in the US.
  2. More than 20% of dropouts are foreign born. Another 17% are Hispanic students.
  3. A high-school dropout is ineligible for 90% of jobs in America.
  4. Kids who don't read proficiently by 4th grade are 4 times likelier to drop out of school. Reading books (for pleasure, not school) improves literacy rates and prevents dropouts. Start a banned book club with your friends to improve reading and literacy skills and, you know, because it’s badass. Sign up for Banned Books Club.
  5. 16- to 24-year-old boys made up nearly 60% of dropouts in 2010. That’s more than 1.8 million students.

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  1. In 2009, the Northeast had a lower status dropout rate (7.1%) than the South and the West (8.4% and 8.6%, respectively)
  2. After World War II, the United States had the #1 high school graduation rate in the world. Today, we have dropped to #22 among 27 industrialized nations.
  3. The percentage of students enrolling in college in the fall immediately following high school completion was 68.2% in 2011. Females enrolled at a higher rate (72.2%) than males (64.7%).
  4. Roughly 80% of white and Asian students complete high school, compared to 55% African-American and Hispanic students.
  5. A high-school graduate’s lifetime income is 50 to 100% higher than a non-graduate’s.
  6. In 2012, only 21 states in the US required students to attend high school until they are 18 or earn a diploma.

Sources

  • 1

    PBS. "Who Isn’t Graduating From High School?." PBS. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/education/dropout-nation/who-isnt-graduating-from-high-school/ (accessed July 22, 2014).

  • 2

    "High School Dropout Statistics." Statistic Brain RSS. http://www.statisticbrain.com/high-school-dropout-statistics/ (accessed July 21, 2014).

  • 3

    "High School Dropout Statistics." Statistic Brain RSS. http://www.statisticbrain.com/high-school-dropout-statistics/ (accessed July 21, 2014).

  • 4

    Cullinan, Bernice E. "Independent Reading and School Achievement", American Association of School Librarians. Accessed February 2014. .

  • 5

    "Fast Facts." National Center for Education Statistics. http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=372 (accessed July 22, 2014).

  • 6

    "Fast Facts." National Center for Education Statistics. http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=372 (accessed July 22, 2014).

  • 7

    "The Broad Foundation - Education." The Broad Foundation - Education. http://www.broadeducation.org/about/crisis_stats.html (accessed July 22, 2014).

  • 8

    Hanson, Jack. "Why Children are Left Behind." Bloomington: AuthorHouse, 2014. Print.

  • 9

    "Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study." National Center for Education Statistics. http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2012/2012046.pdf (accessed July 22, 2014).

  • 10

    The New York Times. "The True Cost Of High School Dropouts." The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/26/opinion/the-true-cost-of-high-school-dropouts.html (accessed July 22, 2014)

  • 11

    The New York Times. "The True Cost Of High School Dropouts." The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/26/opinion/the-true-cost-of-high-school-dropouts.html (accessed July 22, 2014).

Start a rebel book club with your friends.

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