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  1. A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessive heat, often combined with excessive humidity.
  2. Excessive heat is determined by Heat Index Values. The Heat Index (HI) measures how hot it feels according to the apparent temperature (in degrees Fahrenheit) in relationship to the humidity.
  3. Summers in North America are hot, meaning most parts of the US experience heat waves during the summer. The region east of the Rockies tend feel heat waves with high temperature and humidity.
  4. Extreme heat can cause cramps, swelling, and fainting. For pets, spending time in a hot car can be super dangerous too. Hang signs to remind pet owners not to leave their furry friends in hot cars. Sign up for Hot Dogs.
  5. Heat waves kill more Americans than other natural disasters such as floods, lightning, tornadoes, and hurricanes.

Remind pet owners to not leave their furry friends in hot cars.

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  1. Young children and adults over the age of 65 are most likely to experience heat exhaustion or other heat-related illness.
  2. In July 1995, Chicago, Illinois experienced a heat wave that caused over 700 deaths. Scientists predict that the Midwest could endure similar heat waves up to 3 times a year by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase.
  3. If your pet stays outdoors during extreme heat, make sure they have clean water and an area out of the sun where they can cool off.
  4. Urban areas often experience higher temperatures during the summer, referred to as “Urban Heat Island.” This is due to buildings, roads, and other infrastructures absorbing solar energy, resulting in higher temperatures.
  5. Heat waves can cause blackouts and power outages, especially in areas that experience the urban heat island effect.
  6. To stay hydrated during a heat wave, drink plenty of water and eat a salty snack to help replace the salt the body loses when it sweats.

Sources

  • 1

    Climate Communication Science & Outreach. “Heat Waves: The Details.” 2014. Web Accessed November 3, 2014.

  • 2

    Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services. “Beat The Heat Weather Ready Nation Campaign.” National Weather Service, July 28, 2014. Web Accessed November 3, 2014.

  • 3

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “Heat Wave: A Major Summer Killer.” United States Department of Commerce, July 28, 2014. Web Accessed November 3, 2014.

  • 4

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “Heat Wave: A Major Summer Killer.” United States Department of Commerce, July 28, 2014. Web Accessed November 3, 2014.

  • 5

    Altman, Peter. “Killer Summer Heat: Projected Death Toll from Rising Temperatures in America Due to Climate Change.” Natural Resources Defense Council, May 2012. Web Accessed November 4, 2014.

  • 6

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Extreme Heat.” June 1, 2012. Web Accessed November 4, 2014.

  • 7

    United States Environmental Protection Agency. “Climate Impacts in the Midwest.” 2011. Web Accessed November 4, 2014.

  • 8

    The Humane Society of the United States. “Keep Pets Safe in the Heat"May 22, 2014. Web Accessed November 4, 2014.

  • 9

    Department of Environmental Conservation. “Heat Island Effects.” 2014. Web Accessed November 4, 2014.

  • 10

    National Geographic Education. “Urban Heat Island.” 2014. Web Accessed November 4, 2014.

  • 11

    Brink, Susan. “How 100 Degrees Does a Number on You.” National Geographic, July 15, 2013. Web Accessed November 4, 2014.

Remind pet owners to not leave their furry friends in hot cars.

DO IT