Welcome to DoSomething.org, a global movement of 5.5 million young people making positive change, online and off! The 11 facts you want are below, and the sources for the facts are at the very bottom of the page. After you learn something, do something! Find out how to take action here.

  1. Molly and ecstasy are different forms of the drug MDMA.
  2. MDMA acts as a stimulant and a psychedelic. It is typically used in social settings like raves and dance clubs.
  3. The drug floods the brain with the neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, making the user feel full of energy.
  4. Molly is considered the “pure” form of MDMA. It is believed that no adulterants are added to the drug since it is a white powder and different colored stands can be detected. However, this claim is false.
  5. MDPV, methylone, mephedrone and butylone can substitute and be sold as molly.

Tackle a campaign to make the world suck less.

EXPLORE CAMPAIGNS
  1. Even if molly is pure, it can cause elevated heart rates, distortion of thought processes and a rise in body temperature.
  2. Combining MDMA with alcohol or other substances can cause seizures, hyperthermia, comas and cardiac arrest. MDMA can also deplete the body of neurotransmitters, which can lead to depression a day or two after abusing the drug.
  3. Molly users tend to be between the ages of 16 to 24.
  4. Ecstasy is a pressed pill that can have caffeine, cocaine, PCP, dextromethorphan (found in some cough syrups) and amphetamines added in, or substituted for MDMA.
  5. In the United States, more than 12 million people have taken ecstasy.
  6. According to the Drug Abuse Warning Network, there was a 123% increase in the number of emergency room visits involving MDMA from 2004 to 2009.

Sources

  • 1

    National Institute on Drug Abuse. "MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly)." NIDA for Teens. Accessed April 23, 2014.

  • 2

    Csomor, Marina. "There's something (potentially dangerous) about molly." CNN. Last modified August 16, 2012. Accessed April 22, 2014.

  • 3

    Aleksander, Irina. "Molly - Pure, but Not So Simple." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. Last modified June 21, 2013. Accessed April 22, 2014.

  • 4

    Aleksander, Irina. "Molly - Pure, but Not So Simple." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. Last modified June 21, 2013. Accessed April 22, 2014. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/23/fashion/molly-pure-but-not-so-simple.html?pagewanted=all&_r=3&.>

  • 5

    Csomor, Marina. "There's something (potentially dangerous) about molly." CNN. Last modified August 16, 2012. Accessed April 22, 2014.

  • 6

    National Institute on Drug Abuse. "MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly)." NIDA for Teens. Accessed April 23, 2014. Accessed April 22, 2014.

  • 7

    National Institute on Drug Abuse. "MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly)." NIDA for Teens. Accessed April 23, 2014. Accessed April 22, 2014.

  • 8

    Csomor, Marina. "There's something (potentially dangerous) about molly." CNN. Last modified August 16, 2012. Accessed April 22, 2014.

  • 9

    National Institute on Drug Abuse. "MDMA (Ecstasy or Molly)." NIDA for Teens. Accessed April 23, 2014.

  • 10

    National Geographic Society. "Drugs, Inc. Facts: Ecstasy." National Geographic Channel. Accessed April 23, 2014. Accessed April 21, 2014. http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/drugs-inc/articles/drugs-inc-facts-ecstasy/.>

  • 11

    Csomor, Marina. "There's something (potentially dangerous) about molly." CNN. Last modified August 16, 2012. Accessed April 22, 2014. .

Tackle a campaign to make the world suck less.

EXPLORE CAMPAIGNS