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  1. “Organic” is a way of growing agricultural products or raising livestock. The processes used uphold the integrity of the farm and follow a high set of standards that guarantees specific practices are used for both food and non-food products.
  2. The US Department of Agriculture’s tests have found widespread pesticide contamination on popular fruits and vegetables. Encourage shoppers to lower their pesticide intake by buying the 12 most contaminated produce (also known as "the dirty dozen") organic. Sign up for Dirty Dozen.
  3. By law, U.S. organic farmers are required to raise animals without the use of antibiotics or synthetic growth hormones. Plus, organic farmers must provide animals with 100% organic feed and safe, clean, cage-free living conditions.
  4. Packages that contain the USDA Organic seal may have up to 100% organic ingredients included.
  5. When farmers spray pesticides, this can leave residue on produce. Organic farmers use insect traps, careful crop selection (disease-resistant varieties), predator insects or beneficial microorganisms instead to control crop-damaging pests.

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  1. Industry analysts estimate that US organic food sales were $28 billion in 2012 (over 4 percent of total at-home food sales), up 11 percent from 2011.
  2. Products labeled “organic” may reflect higher prices because the production process is often on a smaller scale with more labor- and management-intensive practices and stricter regulations.
  3. Many organic and free-range farms cram thousands of animals together in sheds or mud-filled lots to increase profits, just as factory farms do, and the animals often suffer through the same mutilations that occur on factory farms.
  4. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has established an organic certification program that requires all organic foods to meet strict government standards. These standards regulate how such foods are grown, handled, and processed.
  5. According to PETA, “natural” is virtually a meaningless word when labeled on meat packaging. It does not mean that the product is organic, rather is is free of artificial ingredients or added coloring.
  6. Products that contain at least 70 percent organic ingredients may say "made with organic ingredients" on the label, but may not use the seal.

Sources

  • 1

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. "AGRO-INDUSTRIES FOR DEVELOPMENT." Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 2

    Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. "Fruit and Tree Nut Yearbook Spreadsheet Files." 2010. Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 3

    Organic Trade Association. "How are animals raised organically?" Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 4

    USDA Organic. "LABELING ORGANIC PRODUCTS." Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 5

    Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. "Nutrition and healthy eating." Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 6

    Greene, Catherine. "Growth Patterns in the U.S. Organic Industry." United States Department of Agriculture. Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 7

    The Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture. "Food Labeling." Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 8

    People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. "The Organic and Free-Range Myth." Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 9

    Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. "Nutrition and healthy eating." Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

  • 10

    People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. "The Organic and Free-Range Myth." Web Accessed March 28, 2015,

  • 11

    Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. "Nutrition and healthy eating." Web Accessed March 28, 2015.

Create art urging shoppers to buy organic fruits and veggies.

DO IT