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  1. Roughly 1.5 million high school boys and girls in the U.S. admit to being intentionally hit or physically harmed in the last year by someone they are romantically involved with.
  2. Teens who suffer dating abuse are subject to long-term consequences like alcoholism, eating disorders, promiscuity, thoughts of suicide, and violent behavior.
  3. 1 in 3 young people will be in an abusive or unhealthy relationship. The tricky question: what does an unhealthy relationship even looks like? We've created a guide to help you spot the signs. Pre-sign up for 1 in 3 of Us, launching May 1!
  4. 33% of adolescents in America are victim to sexual, physical, verbal, or emotional dating abuse.
  5. In the U.S., 25% of high school girls have been abused physically or sexually. Teen girls who are abused this way are 6 times more likely to become pregnant or contract a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

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  1. Females between the ages of 16 and 24 are roughly 3 times more likely than the rest of the population to be abused by an intimate partner.
  2. 8 States in the U.S. do not consider a violent dating relationship domestic abuse. Therefore, adolescents, teens, and 20-somethings are unable to apply for a restraining order for protection from the abuser.
  3. Violent behavior often begins between 6th and 12th grade. 72% of 13 and 14-year-olds are “dating.”
  4. 50% of young people who experience rape or physical or sexual abuse will attempt to commit suicide.
  5. Only 1/3 of the teens who were involved in an abusive relationship confided in someone about the violence.
  6. Teens who have been abused hesitate to seek help because they do not want to expose themselves or are unaware of the laws surrounding domestic violence.

Sources

  • 1

    The NO MORE Project . "Dating Abuse Statistics." www.loveisrespect.org. Accessed April 22, 2014. .

  • 2

    USA.gov. "Teen Dating Violence." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed April 22, 2014. .

  • 3

    Liz Claiborne Inc and The Family Fund. “Teen Dating Abuse 2009 Key Topline Findings.” http://nomore.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/teen_dating_abuse_2009_key_topline_findings-1.pdf

  • 4

    The NO MORE Project. "Dating Abuse Statistics." www.loveisrespect.org. Accessed April 22, 2014.

  • 5

    Decker M, Silverman J, Raj A. 2005. Dating Violence and Sexually Transmitted Disease/HIV Testing and Diagnosis Among Adolescent Females. Pediatrics. 116: 272-276.

  • 6

    The NO MORE Project . "Dating Abuse Statistics." www.loveisrespect.org. Accessed April 22, 2014. .

  • 7

    Hattersley Gray, Robin. "Dating Abuse Statistics." School Safety. http://www.campussafetymagazine.com/article/Dating-Abuse-Statistics (accessed April 22, 2014).

  • 8

    Hattersley Gray, Robin. "Dating Abuse Statistics." School Safety. Accessed April 22, 2014. .

  • 9

    Chamberlain PhD MPH, Linda. "Dating Violence Literature Review." Futures Without Violence. Accessed on April 22, 2014. .

  • 10

    Hattersley Gray, Robin. "Dating Abuse Statistics." School Safety. Accessed April 22, 2014. .

  • 11

    Hattersley Gray, Robin. "Dating Abuse Statistics." School Safety. Accessed April 22, 2014. .

  • 12

    USA.gov. "Teen Dating Violence." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/intimatepartnerviolence/teen_dating_violence.html (accessed April 20, 2014).

Feeling Down? Talk to a trained crisis counselor. Text “DS” TO 741-741. Free, 24/7, Confidential.