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  1. In the past 60 years, vaccines helped eradicate one disease (smallpox) and are close to eradicating another (polio).
  2. Vaccines prevent more than 2.5 million deaths each year.
  3. Scientific studies and reviews continue to show no relationship between vaccines and autism.
  4. New and underutilized vaccines could avert nearly 4 million deaths by 2015.
  5. Vaccines cause “herd immunity,” which means if the majority of people in a community have been vaccinated against a disease, an unvaccinated person is less likely to get sick because others are less likely to get sick and spread the disease.

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  1. Vaccines helped reduce measles deaths globally by 78% between 2000 and 2008. In sub-Saharan Africa, deaths dropped by 92% in the same period.
  2. There are existing vaccines that could stop rotavirus and pneumonia — two conditions that kill nearly 3 million children under the age of five every year.
  3. The CDC has reported a 99% reduction in the incidence of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae since the introduction of the vaccination against the disease in 1988.
  4. Researchers estimate that a viable malaria vaccine could be ready for children in the developing world as early as 2015.
  5. Not all vaccines are given as shots. Some vaccines are given orally.
  6. Most diseases prevented by vaccines are no longer common in the United States. If vaccines weren’t used, just a few cases could quickly turn into tens or hundreds of thousands.

Sources

  • 1

    "Vaccines bring 7 diseases under control." Vaccines bring 7 diseases under control. http://www.unicef.org/pon96/hevaccin.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

  • 2

    "No vaccine for the scaremongers." WHO. http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/86/6/08-030608/en/ (accessed August 1, 2014).

  • 3

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Infant Immunizations FAQs." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html (accessed July 31, 2014).

  • 4

    "Why Childhood Vaccines? ONE's Vaccine Policy Pitch." ONE. http://www.one.org/us/policy/why-childhood-vaccines-ones-vaccine-policy-pitch/ (accessed August 1, 2014).

  • 5

    "Community Immunity ("Herd Immunity")." Home. http://www.vaccines.gov/basics/protection/ (accessed August 1, 2014).

  • 6

    "Measles & Rubella Initiative." United Nations Foundation. http://www.unfoundation.org/what-we-do/campaigns-and-initiatives/measles-initiative/ (accessed August 1, 2014).

  • 7

    "IMMUNIZATION FACTS AND FIGURES April 2013." unicef. http://www.unicef.org/immunization/files/UNICEF_Key_facts_and_figures_on_Immunization_April_2013(1).pdf (accessed August 1, 2014).

  • 8

    CDC. "Haemophilus b conjugate vaccines for prevention of Haemophilus influenzae type b disease among infants and children two months of age and older: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)." MMWR 1991;40(No. RR-1):1–7.

  • 9

    "No vaccine for the scaremongers." WHO. http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/86/6/08-030608/en/ (accessed August 1, 2014).

  • 10

    "Typhoid Vaccines." CDC. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/typhoid.pdf (accessed August 1, 2014).

  • 11

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Infant Immunizations FAQs." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html (accessed July 31, 2014).

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