How to Green Your Prom Dress

Attire for guys has always been green - they usually rent a tux that is worn hundreds of times (Ewww!). Girls, on the other hand…

A teen girl spends an average of $500 on her prom threads – that includes the dress, shoes and accessories that will probably be worn for all of a few hours of her life. That’s right, don’t kid yourself – you’re never going to wear it again. Chances are, it'll end up in a landfill where it will take literally hundreds of years to decompose ... but all hope isn’t lost. There are a few things you can do to be friendly to Mother Earth:

  • Donate! How many semi-formal and cotillion dresses do you have shoved in the back of your closet suffocating in plastic? They probably haven’t seen the light of day since they were worn on that day long ago. How about getting those dresses into the hands of less fortunate girls? Consider running a collection drive at your school so those beautiful, gently-worn dresses can go to girls who can’t afford them. Contact the DonateMyDress.org for a list of nationwide spots where you can send the donations of used formal dresses.
  • Swap! Remember that dress your friend wore to the spring formal that you swore would look jaw-dropping on you… Chances are it’s been long forgotten in her wardrobe somewhere, so instead spending a wad of money consider trading dresses with your friends. And you can spend your dough on things you’ll actually reuse, like shoes and accessories.
  • Buy green. If you must have a new dress, try an eco-friendly clothing line that uses organic fabrics… and don’t worry, you can be environmentally aware with out sacrificing style. Check out FashionConscience.com, a UK-based company whose sole mission is to hunt down the sexiest, hippest and most luxurious ethical fashion to create a one-stop, eco-fashion e-tail boutique.
  • Try vintage. This pretty much guarantees that nobody else will be wearing the same outfit, and vintage stores also have rare hair accessories, shoes and evening bags at a fraction of the cost of newer items.

Sources:

GreenDaily.com
TreeHugger.com
PromSpot.com